Host vibration — A cue to host location by the parasite, Biosteres longicaudatus

@article{Lawrence2004HostV,
  title={Host vibration — A cue to host location by the parasite, Biosteres longicaudatus},
  author={P. Lawrence},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={48},
  pages={249-251}
}
SummaryBiosteres longicaudatus Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Bracon dae) is a solitary endoparasite of Anastrepha suspensa larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae), which live in fruit tissue. Larvae make andible noises within macerated fruit or larval medium in which they are reared. Parasite females readily located normal, mobile larvae and spent a mean of 16.5±4.7 min/visit to parasitize these hosts. In contrast, females were unable to locate etherized or dead hosts and abandoned them after only 1.9±0.9 and 2… Expand
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