Host race formation in Tetranychus urticae: genetic differentiation, host plant preference, and mate choice in a tomato and a cucumber strain

@article{Gotoh1993HostRF,
  title={Host race formation in Tetranychus urticae: genetic differentiation, host plant preference, and mate choice in a tomato and a cucumber strain},
  author={Tetsuo Gotoh and John Bruin and Maurice W. Sabelis and S B J Menken},
  journal={Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata},
  year={1993},
  volume={68}
}
The two‐spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, occurs in two colour forms in greenhouses in the Netherlands: a red form on tomato and a green form on cucumber. The evolutionary status of these strains was analysed by studying genetic differentiation, host plant preference, and mate choice. Males of the tomato strain preferred the female (30 h‐old) teleiochrysales from the same strain to those of the cucumber strain, independent of the host plants (tomato, cucumber, bean) on which the… 
Factors determining the host plant range of the phytophagous mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae): a method for quantifying host plant acceptance
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The host plant acceptance of the phytophagous mite Tetranychus urticae was experimentally quantified and the two variables were positively correlated across host plants; host plant species on which females settled less readily compared to host plants with high fecundity.
Influence of previous host plants on the reproductive success of a polyphagous mite pest, Halotydeus destructor (Trombidiformes: Penthaleidae).
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It was found that the strain previously exposed to a tomato environment performed better than the unexposed strain: its population increased faster; the prey population declined faster; and the damage to new-grown tomato leaves was considerably lower.
Induction of Preference and Performance after Acclimation to Novel Hosts in a Phytophagous Spider Mite: Adaptive Plasticity?
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TLDR
Although in the laboratory studies both transgenic lines enhanced the T. urticae population increase, the glasshouse studies were not as conclusive and they only suggest the possibility of any real difference between the transgenic and non-transgenic genotypes.
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The main conclusion is that A. hystrix, which so far has been considered as a host generalist, in fact may be a complex species consisting of highly specialized host races.
The use of fecundity, lobe biometry and the RAPD-PCR technique in order to compare strains of Tetranychus sp.
TLDR
An investigation using the random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) showed T. cinnabarinus as a distinct group, but the mixing of the individuals of the four other strains raises the question of the role of hybridization and host plant selection in the evolution of the Tetranychus complex.
Host plant associations in the spider mite Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae): insights from molecular phylogeography
  • M. Navajas
  • Biology
    Experimental & Applied Acarology
  • 2004
TLDR
The results provide some support for the hypothesis that an evolutionary trend towards polyphagy has occurred in the family Tetra-nychidae and it seems that the major characteristic of T. urticae is its high colonization potential.
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