Host race formation and sympatric speciation in Rhagoletis fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae).

@article{Bush1992HostRF,
  title={Host race formation and sympatric speciation in Rhagoletis fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae).},
  author={G. Bush},
  journal={Psyche},
  year={1992},
  volume={99},
  pages={335-357}
}
In 1866, some 200 years after the introduction of apples to North America, a local newspaper reported that larvae of an unknown fly were infesting apples (Malus pumila) in the Hudson River valley of New York (Illingworth, 1912). Shortly after the maggots were found in apples, Benjamin Walsh (1867) described the fly as Trypeta pomonella (later recognized as Rhagoletis pomonella (Snow, 1894)). Walsh's description was based on specimens reared from apples grown in eastern United States, as well as… Expand
The Impeccable Timing of the Apple Maggot Fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae), and its Implications for Ecological Speciation
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To test for how rapid and repeatable shifts in life history timing are driving ecological divergence of R. pomonella in the Pacific Northwestern US, a field-based experiment was used to characterize the host-associated eclosion and flight activity patterns of adults, and the feeding times of larvae at a field site in Vancouver, Washington. Expand
Rapid and repeatable shifts in life‐history timing of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) following colonization of novel host plants in the Pacific Northwestern United States
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It is concluded that host‐associated fly populations are temporally offset 24.4% to 92.6% in their seasonal distributions, which implies that R. pomonella possesses the capacity for rapid and repeatable shifts in diapause life history to match host‐fruiting phenology, which can generate ecologically based reproductive isolation, and potentially biodiversity in the process. Expand
Sympatric Host-Race Formation and Speciation in Rhagoletis (Diptera: Tephritidae): A Tale of Two Species for Charles D.
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If the plethora of host specialists is due, at least in part, to numerous plant niches that have imposed divergent selection pressures on phytophagous insects, then the relationship between host-plant specialization and reproductive isolation should be considered. Expand
Phenological and electrophoretic evidence for a new blueberry‐infesting species in the Rhagoletis pomonella sibling species complex
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Selective maintenance of allozyme differences among sympatric host races of the apple maggot fly.
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The findings confirm that postzygotic reproductive isolation can evolve as a pleiotropic consequence of host-associated adaptation, a central tenet of nonallopatric speciation and suggest that one reason for the paucity of reported fitness trade-offs is a failure to consider adequately costs associated with coordinating an insect's life cycle with the phenology of its host plant. Expand
Rhagoletis zephyria (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the Great Lakes Basin: a Native Insect on Native Hosts?
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The hypothesis that R. zephyria in the Great Lakes region has been introduced is examined to hypothesize that these infestations may not be the result of recent (historical) introductions of R. ZEPhyria, but rather they may represent native R.Zephyrias populations. Expand
The population genetics of the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella and the snowberry maggot, R. zephyria: implications for models of sympatric speciation
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This work investigates whether hybridization and genetic introgression is occurring between two members of the Rhagoletis pomonella, whose primary hosts are domestic apples and hawthorns, and R. zephyria (Snow) whose host is snowberries. Expand
A second case of genetic host races in Rhagoletis? A population genetic comparison of sympatric host populations in the European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi
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Results from Mpi suggest the formation of sympatric host races in R. cerasi, but additional polymorphic markers are necessary, as well as significant population differentiation that was in accordance with host race differentiation. Expand
The role of diapause and host fruit odor preference in sympatric race formation of Rhagoletis pomonella.
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The evidence suggests the genetic architecture of diapause and fruit odor discrimination is complicated but resolves that both traits serve as preand post-mating barriers to gene flow. Expand
The genetic structure of hawthorn‐infesting Rhagoletis pomonella populations in Mexico: implications for sympatric host race formation
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Results from a microsatellite survey imply that volcanic activity in the eastern EVTM may have been responsible for the initial geographical isolation of the Mexican and northern hawthorn‐fly populations c. Expand
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Findings indicate that apple and hawthorn infesting populations of R. pomonella are partially allochronically isolated, and regressions establish a link between allozyme loci displaying inter‐host differentiation and a developmental trait (adult eclosion) responsible for partially isolating the races. Expand
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Genetic differentiation at allozyme loci in the Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) species complex.
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