Host plant utilization in the comma butterfly: sources of variation and evolutionary implications

@article{Janz2004HostPU,
  title={Host plant utilization in the comma butterfly: sources of variation and evolutionary implications},
  author={Niklas Janz and S{\"o}ren Nylin and Nina Wedell},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={99},
  pages={132-140}
}
A major challenge in the study of insect-host plant interactions is to understand how the different aspects of offspring performance interact to produce a preference hierarchy in the ovipositing females. In this paper we investigate host plant preference of the polyphagous butterfly Polygonia c-album (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and compare it with several aspects of the life history of its offspring (growth rate, development time, adult size, survival and female fecundity). Females and offspring… Expand
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Both female and larval plant preferences differed between broods, but the preferences of females and offspring were in close agreement, also differing in the same way as that of males. Expand
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1. In the study of the evolution of insect–host plant interactions, important information is provided by host ranking correspondences among female preference, offspring preference, and offspringExpand
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TLDR
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TLDR
While each plant requires a unique gene regulation in the caterpillar, both phylogenetic relatedness and host plant growth form appear to influence the expression profile of the polyphagous comma butterfly, in agreement with phylogenetic studies of host plant utilization in butterflies. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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