Host plant selection of Chrysolina clathrata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Mpumalanga, South Africa

@article{Boyd2009HostPS,
  title={Host plant selection of Chrysolina clathrata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Mpumalanga, South Africa},
  author={Robert S. Boyd and Micheal A. Davis and Michael A. Wall and Kevin Balkwill},
  journal={Insect Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={16}
}
Hyperaccumulated elements such as Ni may defend plants against some natural enemies whereas other enemies may circumvent this defense. The Ni hyperaccumulator Berkheya coddii Roessler (Asteraceae) is a host plant species for Chrysolina clathrata (Clark), which suffers no apparent harm by consuming its leaf tissue. Beetle specimens collected from B. coddii had a whole body Ni concentration of 260 μg/g dry weight, despite consuming leaf material containing 15 100 μg Ni/g. Two experiments were… 
Ecophysiology of nickel hyperaccumulating plants from South Africa - from ultramafic soil and mycorrhiza to plants and insects.
TLDR
Analysis of elemental distribution in plant parts showed that in most cases the hyperaccumulated metal was stored in physiologically inactive tissues such as the foliar epidermis, but an exception is Berkheya coddii, which has a distinctly different pattern of Ni distribution in leaves, with the highest concentration in the mesophyll.
Divergent biology of facultative heavy metal plants.
Preface

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