Host-pathogen interactions: the attributes of virulence.

@article{Casadevall2001HostpathogenIT,
  title={Host-pathogen interactions: the attributes of virulence.},
  author={A. Casadevall and L. Pirofski},
  journal={The Journal of infectious diseases},
  year={2001},
  volume={184 3},
  pages={
          337-44
        }
}
Virulence is one of a number of possible outcomes of host-microbe interaction. As such, microbial virulence is dependent on host factors, as exemplified by the pathogenicity of avirulent microbes in immunocompromised hosts and the lack of pathogenicity of virulent pathogens in immune hosts. Pathogen-centered views of virulence assert that pathogens are distinguished from nonpathogens by their expression of virulence factors. Although this concept appears to apply to certain microbes that cause… Expand
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