Host finding behaviour as a predictor of foraging strategy in entomopathogenic nematodes

@article{Grewal1994HostFB,
  title={Host finding behaviour as a predictor of foraging strategy in entomopathogenic nematodes},
  author={Parwinder Singh Grewal and Edwin E. Lewis and Randy R. Gaugler and James F Campbell},
  journal={Parasitology},
  year={1994},
  volume={108},
  pages={207 - 215}
}
SUMMARY Foraging strategies of eight species of entomopathogenic nematodes were predicted from their response to host volatile cues and dispersal behaviour on 2-dimensional substrates. Positive directional response to chemical cues and similar distances travelled on smooth (agar) or nictation substrates (agar overlaid with sand grains) by Heterorhabditis bacterio-phora, Heterorhabditis megidis, Steinernema anomali, and Steinernema glaseri suggest their cruising approach to finding hosts. The… 

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