Host Specific Social Parasites (Psithyrus) Indicate Chemical Recognition System in Bumblebees

@article{Martin2010HostSS,
  title={Host Specific Social Parasites (Psithyrus) Indicate Chemical Recognition System in Bumblebees},
  author={Stephen John Martin and Jonathan Carruthers and Paul H Williams and Falko P. Drijfhout},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={36},
  pages={855-863}
}
Semiochemicals influence many aspects of insect behavior, including interactions between parasites and their hosts. We studied the chemical recognition system of bumblebees (Bombus) by examining the cuticular hydrocarbon cues of 14 species, including five species of social parasites, known as cuckoo bees (subgenus Psithyrus). We found that bumblebees possess species-specific alkene positional isomer profiles that are stable over large geographical regions and are mimicked by three host-specific… 
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