Hospitalized Pets as a Source of Carbapenem-Resistance

@article{Gentilini2018HospitalizedPA,
  title={Hospitalized Pets as a Source of Carbapenem-Resistance},
  author={Fabio Gentilini and Mar{\'i}a Elena Turba and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique Pasquali and Domenico Mion and Noemi Romagnoli and Elisa Zambon and Daniele Terni and Gisele Peirano and Johann D. D. Pitout and Antonio Parisi and Vittorio Sambri and Renato Giulio Zanoni},
  journal={Frontiers in Microbiology},
  year={2018},
  volume={9}
}
The massive and irrational use of antibiotics in livestock productions has fostered the occurrence and spread of resistance to “old class antimicrobials.” To cope with that phenomenon, some regulations have been already enforced in the member states of the European Union. However, a role of livestock animals in the relatively recent alerts on the rapid worldwide increase of resistance to last-choice antimicrobials as carbapenems is very unlikely. Conversely, these antimicrobials are… 

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