Horse sense: social status of horses (Equus caballus) affects their likelihood of copying other horses’ behavior

@article{Krueger2007HorseSS,
  title={Horse sense: social status of horses (Equus caballus) affects their likelihood of copying other horses’ behavior},
  author={Konstanze Krueger and J{\"u}rgen Heinze},
  journal={Animal Cognition},
  year={2007},
  volume={11},
  pages={431-439}
}
Animals that live in stable social groups need to gather information on their own relative position in the group’s social hierarchy, by either directly threatening or by challenging others, or indirectly and in a less perilous manner , by observing interactions among others. Indirect inference of dominance relationships has previously been reported from primates, rats, birds, and fish. Here, we show that domestic horses, Equus caballus, are similarly capable of social cognition. Taking… 

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper

The effects of age, rank and neophobia on social learning in horses
TLDR
It is argued that horses show social learning in the context of their social ecology and that research procedures must take such contexts into account and found that young, low-ranking and more exploratory horses learned by observing older members of their own group, and the older the horse, the more slowly it appeared to learn.
Social learning across species: horses (Equus caballus) learn from humans by observation
TLDR
It is demonstrated that horses learn socially across species, in this case from humans, given that they identify individual humans and orientate on the focus of human attention.
Social Learning in Horses—Fact or Fiction?
TLDR
Horses are undoubtedly sensitive to intra-species transfer of information but this transfer does not appear to satisfy the criteria for social learning, and thus there is no solid evidence for true social learning in horses.
Effects of size and personality on social learning and human-directed behaviour in horses (Equus caballus)
TLDR
Size (full-sized horse/pony) and personality influenced the human-related behaviours of the horses and it is suggested a future focus on these aspects to deepen the understanding of human–horse communication.
Horses (Equus caballus) use human local enhancement cues and adjust to human attention
TLDR
It is concluded that horses can use humans as a local enhancement cue independently of their body posture or gaze consistency when the persons remain close to the food source and that horses seem to orientate on the attention of familiar more than of unfamiliar persons.
Coping in groups of domestic horses - Review from a social and neurobiological perspective
Abstract Many sport horses live solitary, with no physical contact to other horses allowed for years, for many different reasons including limiting risk of injuries caused by other horses. Other
Cognition and learning in horses (Equus caballus): What we know and why we should ask more
TLDR
Current research within three related areas of horse cognition: human-horse interactions, social learning and independent learning in horses is explored.
The social structure and interactions within groups of horses (Equus caballus) containing stallions
TLDR
Two findings support the hypothesis that the stallions have a suppressing effect on the behaviour of the mares and sub-adults, and have significance for further research in the field of social structure of mammals.
The present situation and future prospects of studies on horse cognition
Horses (Equus caballus) have lived with humans for over 5500 years. Despite this, their cognitive abilities have not received much research attention compared with those of dogs (Canis familiaris),
Horses fail to use social learning when solving spatial detour tasks
TLDR
It is concluded that horses exposed to prior demonstration did not perform better than control horses in solving spatial detour tasks and was unable to repeat this result in a similar set up with a new group of horses and older, dominant demonstrator horses.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 64 REFERENCES
Pinyon jays use transitive inference to predict social dominance
TLDR
It is shown that highly social pinyon jays (Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus) draw sophisticated inferences about their own dominance status relative to that of strangers that they have observed interacting with known individuals, demonstrating that animals use transitive inference in social settings and implying that such cognitive capabilities are widespread among social species.
Use of human-given cues by domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and horses (Equus caballus)
Abstract Sixteen domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and four horses (Equus caballus) were tested for their ability to use human-given manual and facial cues in an object-choice task. Two of the four
CHAPTER 4 – Social Learning in Monkeys: Primate “Primacy” Reconsidered
The recognition that humans share many traits with other primates can have, as an unintended correlate, an uncritical willingness to ascribe human traits to other primate species. Behavioral
The effects of demonstrator social status and prior foraging success on social learning in laying hens
TLDR
Differences in demonstrator salience suggested either that there was an interaction between dominance and gender in demonstrators salience or that dominant hens might have been influential because of some factor imperfectly associated with their dominance status.
DOMINANCE HIERARCHIES IN DOMESTIC HORSES
TLDR
Body weight, but not age, appear to affect rank in the equine hierarchy, and the daughters of a dominant mare were dominant within their own herds.
Relationships and communication in socially natural horse herds
TLDR
In horses, it was clearly shown that the causes for female dispersal were incest avoidance and not intra-specific competition, and this is confirmed for mammal species where tenure length by males exceeds the age at first reproduction in females.
Behaviour of horses in the ''round pen technique''
Abstract I investigated the behavioural background of the way horses learn to follow humans in the “round pen technique” suggested by “horse whisperers” as a gentle method for initial horse training.
How animals learn from each other
This paper explores ways by which animals may learn from one another, using examples drawn mostly from the chicken, an animal for which social learning is likely to be less dangerous than individual
Behavior patterns and communication in feral horses.
TLDR
These horses showed social organizations similar to other feral horses and plains zebras, and Harem group, stability resulted from strong dominance by dominant stallions, and fidelity of group members.
Transitive inference in animals: Reasoning or conditioned associations?
It is widely accepted that many species of non-human animals appear to engage in transitive inference, producing appropriate responses to novel pairings of non-adjacent members of an ordered series
...
1
2
3
4
5
...