Hormones and the development of sex differences in behavior

@article{AdkinsRegan2007HormonesAT,
  title={Hormones and the development of sex differences in behavior},
  author={Elizabeth Adkins-Regan},
  journal={Journal of Ornithology},
  year={2007},
  volume={148},
  pages={17-26}
}
Birds exhibit striking diversity in behavioral sex differences. A necessary complement to the study of the ecology and evolution of these sex differences is discovering the proximate physiological mechanisms for their development (sexual differentiation) and adult expression. Experiments with Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) have shown that sex differences in crowing, strutting, and sexual receptivity are produced partly or largely by hormonal dimorphism in adulthood (activational effects of… Expand

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