Hormone therapy and risk of ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Shi2016HormoneTA,
  title={Hormone therapy and risk of ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Li-feng Shi and Yan Wu and Cai-yun Li},
  journal={Menopause},
  year={2016},
  volume={23},
  pages={417–424}
}
Objective:Our objective was to perform a meta-analysis examining the risk of ovarian cancer with different types and regimens (continuous or sequential) of hormone therapy (HT). Methods:PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase databases were searched until December 2014 using the terms: HT, estrogen therapy (ET), ovarian cancer, postmenopausal, and menopausal. HT was considered unopposed ET, estrogen–progestin therapy (EPT), or ET+EPT (ET followed by EPT). Results:Of 180 studies identified, 12 were… 
Menopausal hormone therapy treatment options and ovarian cancer risk: A Swedish prospective population‐based matched‐cohort study
TLDR
EP‐M HT, notably continuous regimens, were associated with a modestly increased risk of ovarian cancer and the role of E‐MHT requires further clarification.
Parity, menopausal hormone therapy, and risk of ovarian granulosa cell tumor - A population-based case-control study.
TLDR
Unlike in epithelial ovarian cancer, AGCT development is not clearly associated with parity, and users of postmenopausal HT do not seem to carry an excess risk for AGCT formation.
The Influence of Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Potential Lifestyle Interactions in Female Cancer Development—a Population-Based Prospective Study
TLDR
The largely additive associations between HT and the investigated lifestyle factors support the notion that high levels of hormones in itself play an important etiological role in female reproductive cancers, whereas the possible protective impact in colorectal cancer might be limited to women with an otherwise healthy lifestyle.
Hormone replacement therapy after surgery for epithelial ovarian cancer.
TLDR
Meta-analysis of these studies showed that HRT may improve overall survival and progression-free survival, and very low for quality-of-life assessment, incidence of breast cancer, transient ischaemic attack (TIA), cerebrovascular accident (CVA) and myocardial infarction (MI).
Efficacy of Postoperative Hormone Replacement Therapy on Prognosis of Patients with Serous Ovarian Carcinoma
TLDR
Postoperative HRT is not a prognostic factor for PFS of patients with papillary SOC, and the strongest independent variables in predicting PFS were FIGO stage and disease that was not optimally debulked.
Prior uterine myoma and risk of ovarian cancer: a population-based case-control study
TLDR
It was revealed that a significantly higher risk of ovarian cancer in women with previous uterine myoma, through an indirect mechanism, was observed in women who underwent surgical removal of the uterineMyoma.
Thyroid Cancer Benefits the Prognosis of Ovarian Cancer: A SEER-Based Study
TLDR
Survival was better with OC2TC than with OC from 2000 to 2014 rather than 1980–1994, suggesting that TC improved the survival of OC patients from 2000to 2014.
Hormones and risk of breast and gynecological cancer
TLDR
Oral contraception increases breast cancer risk but is protective against ovarian and endometrial cancers and the influence of ovarian hyperstimulation has been controversially discussed and no clear association with these hormone-dependent tumors has been observed.
[Follow-up of patients treated for an epithelial ovarian cancer, place of hormone replacement therapy and of contraception: Article drafted from the French Guidelines in oncology entitled "Initial management of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer" developed by FRANCOGYN, CNGOF, SFOG, GINECO-ARCA
TLDR
HRT is not contra-indicated in women older than 45 presenting a climacteric syndrome after the treatment of a high grade serous (Grade B) or of a mucinous (GradeC) ovarian, tubal or primitive peritoneal cancer.
Menopausal Hormone Therapy, Age, and Chronic Diseases: Perspectives on Statistical Trends
  • J. Bolton
  • Medicine
    Chemical research in toxicology
  • 2016
TLDR
A Perspective on Statistical Trends evaluates the current data on HT and risk for chronic diseases as a function of age and suggests that younger women (50–60) may be protected from heart disease with only a slight increase in breast cancer risk and older women (>65) are more susceptible to breast cancer and heart disease and should avoid HT.
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