Hormonal Changes in Mammalian Fathers

@article{WynneEdwards2001HormonalCI,
  title={Hormonal Changes in Mammalian Fathers},
  author={Katherine E Wynne-Edwards},
  journal={Hormones and Behavior},
  year={2001},
  volume={40},
  pages={139-145}
}
  • K. Wynne-Edwards
  • Published 1 September 2001
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Hormones and Behavior
Known and hypothesized relationships between steroid (estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) and peptide (oxytocin, vasopressin, and prolactin) hormones and the expression of mammalian paternal behavior are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on newly emerging animal models, including nonhuman primates and men, with elaborate paternal behavior repertoires. Currently available data are broadly consistent with a working hypothesis that the expression of parental behavior will involve homologous… Expand
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