Horatio’s Philosophy in Hamlet

@article{Hui2013HoratiosPI,
  title={Horatio’s Philosophy in Hamlet},
  author={Andrew M. Hui},
  journal={Renaissance Drama},
  year={2013},
  volume={41},
  pages={151 - 171}
}
  • Andrew M. Hui
  • Published 1 September 2013
  • Philosophy
  • Renaissance Drama
“There are,” says a poet as ingenious as profound, “more things in heaven and earth, than are dreamt of in our philosophy.” This sentiment, which Genius accidentally let drop, is in the main applicable also to the philosophy of our own day; and, with a slight modification, I shall be ready to adopt it as my own. The only change that is requisite to make it available for my purpose would be the addition—“and also between heaven and earth there are many things which are not dreamt of in our… 
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References

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Horatio is rarely thought of as a sovereign character in Hamlet. In fact, some Shakespearean commentators regard Horatio as a “nobody” or a “non-entity,” a poorly developed figure whose role in the
Specters of Horatio
Throughout Hamlet, Horatio is a figure privileged to interpret, and this privilege emerges in the doubled-edged spectrality of his social position. The justness of his interpretive authority
Thresholds to Memory and Commodity in Shakespeare's Endings
ONCE SHAKESPEARE CRITICISM has come to differentiate, in terms of both reciprocity and division, between the representation of textual meaning and the circumstances of performing practice, no single
bk. 1, chap. 16, pt. 1, 225-26. 30. Ibid., 227. For the intersection of the Shakespearean and Calvinist sparrows, see Alan Sinfield
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