Hong Kong’s Dirty Little Secret

@article{Harter2000HongKD,
  title={Hong Kong’s Dirty Little Secret},
  author={Seth Harter},
  journal={Journal of Urban History},
  year={2000},
  volume={27},
  pages={113 - 92}
}
  • Seth Harter
  • Published 1 November 2000
  • Sociology
  • Journal of Urban History

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