Honeydew Collecting in Malagasy Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini) and Observations on Competition with Invasive Ants

@inproceedings{Koch2011HoneydewCI,
  title={Honeydew Collecting in Malagasy Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini) and Observations on Competition with Invasive Ants},
  author={Hauke Koch and Claire Corcoran and Marlotte Jonker},
  year={2011}
}
We present the first record of honeydew feeding in Malagasy stingless bees. Two species of stingless bees, Liotrigona mahafalya and L. madecassa, collected honeydew produced by mealybugs on an Albizia perrieri (Fabaceae) tree in the dry deciduous forest of Kirindy, Madagascar. Honeydew might represent an important part of the diet of Malagasy stingless bees, especially in times of scarce floral resources in the highly seasonal environment of western Madagascar. The interaction between the bees… 

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