Honeybee colonies achieve fitness through dancing

@article{Sherman2002HoneybeeCA,
  title={Honeybee colonies achieve fitness through dancing},
  author={Gavin Sherman and P. Kirk Visscher},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2002},
  volume={419},
  pages={920-922}
}
The honeybee dance language, in which foragers perform dances containing information about the distance and direction to food sources, is the quintessential example of symbolic communication in non-primates. The dance language has been the subject of controversy, and of extensive research into the mechanisms of acquiring, decoding and evaluating the information in the dance. The dance language has been hypothesized, but not shown, to increase colony food collection. Here we show that colonies… 
Foraging in honeybees—when does it pay to dance?
TLDR
The main benefit of the honeybee's dance communication seems to be that it enables the colony to forage at the most profitable patches only, ignoring forage patches that are of low quality.
Honeybees forage more successfully without the “dance language” in challenging environments
TLDR
The results raise the possibility that humans have created environments to which the waggle dance language is not well adapted, and this change in information-use strategy suggests bees learn about the value of dance information.
The honeybee waggle dance: can we follow the steps?
Progress in Understanding How the Waggle Dance Improves the Foraging Efficiency of Honey Bee Colonies
The waggle dance of the honey bee is one of the most extensively studied forms of animal communication, but only recently have investigators closely examined its adaptive significance, that is, how
Informational conflicts created by the waggle dance
TLDR
It is found that foragers preferred to follow dancers carrying food odours they knew from previous field trips, independently of the spatial information encoded in the dance, and neither odour identity nor the location indicated by the dancer was an important factor for the reactivation success of a dance.
Waggle dance effect: dancing in autumn reduces the mass loss of a honeybee colony
TLDR
The efficacy of the waggle dances is examined by physically preventing bees from dancing and then analyzing the changes in daily mass of the hive as an index of daily food collection, indicating that dance is effective for food collection.
Why, when and where did honey bee dance communication evolve?
TLDR
Recent theoretical and empirical research into the ecological circumstances that make dance communication beneficial in present day environments suggest that the “dance language” is most beneficial when food sources differ greatly in quality and are hard to find.
Why do honey bees dance?
TLDR
It is found that the clustering of bee forage sites in a variety of habitats by evaluating the bees’ dances is more clustered in tropical than in temperate habitats, which supports the hypothesis that in the context of foraging, the dance language is an adaptation to the particular habitats in which the honey bees evolved.
Social modulation of individual differences in dance communication in honey bees
TLDR
The study shows that a complex interplay between individual behavioural differences and social interactions drives the dance communication needed to effectively organise the colony’s collective foraging behaviour.
The use of waggle dance information by honey bees throughout their foraging careers
TLDR
It is concluded that foragers make extensive use of the waggle dance not only to start work at new, unfamiliar food sources but also to resume work at old, familiar food sources.
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