Homosexual interactions in bed bugs: alarm pheromones as male recognition signals

@article{Ryne2009HomosexualII,
  title={Homosexual interactions in bed bugs: alarm pheromones as male recognition signals},
  author={Camilla Ryne},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2009},
  volume={78},
  pages={1471-1475}
}
  • C. Ryne
  • Published 1 December 2009
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Same-sex sexual behavior in insects and arachnids: prevalence, causes, and consequences
TLDR
Evidence is provided for same-sex sexual behavior in ~110 species of insects and arachnids based on mistaken identification and is probably maintained because the cost of rejecting a valid opportunity to mate with a female is greater than that of mistakenly mating with a male.
Nymphs of the common bed bug (Cimex lectularius) produce anti-aphrodisiac defence against conspecific males
TLDR
Alarm pheromones are commonly looked upon as a system in predator/prey communication, but here it is shown that they may be used as multipurpose signals such as decreasing the risk of nymphal mating by males.
Duplicated Female Receptacle Organs for Traumatic Insemination in the Tropical Bed Bug Cimex hemipterus: Adaptive Variation or Malformation?
During mating, male bed bugs (Cimicidae) pierce the female abdomen to inject sperm using their needle-like genitalia. Females evolved specialized paragenital organs (the spermalege and associated
Lethal Fighting in Nematodes Is Dependent on Developmental Pathway: Male-Male Fighting in the Entomopathogenic Nematode Steinernema longicaudum
TLDR
Fighting occurred between males developing in mixed-sex social groups, indicating that it is an evolved trait and not an abnormal response to absence of females, and proposed that these nematodes may be a useful model for studies of aggression.
Behavior and control of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius l. (hemiptera: cimicidae)
TLDR
It was showed that virgin females did not produce alarm pheromone as a deterrent for mating, although the sample size was small, and the use of heat with residual insecticides on surfaces over time was evaluated, using both a resistant and susceptible bed bug strain.
Male‐mimicking females increase male‐male interactions, and decrease male survival and condition in a female‐polymorphic damselfly
  • E. Gering
  • Psychology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2017
TLDR
Examination of how the proportion of females in a population that exhibit male mimicry, a mating resistance trait, influences conspecific males’ behavior, condition, and survival suggests that, under sufficiently crowded conditions, female mating resistance traits such asmale mimicry could have pronounced indirect effects on male behavior, conditions, and Survival.
Oviposition pheromones in haematophagous insects.
Surviving in Sympatry: Paragenital Divergence and Sexual Mimicry between a Pair of Traumatically Inseminating Plant Bugs
TLDR
A cryptic species of traumatically inseminating plant bug living sympatrically with its sister species, Coridromius tahitiensis, in French Polynesia supports a role for reproductive character divergence and interspecies sexual mimicry in limiting interspecific mating brought about by indiscriminate male mating behavior.
Effects of Cyclic Feeding and Starvation, Mating, and Sperm Condition on Egg Production and Fertility in the Common Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)
TLDR
Findings indicate egg production and hatch are governed by complex interactions among female and male age, frequency of feeding and mating, and sperm condition.
Male Mating Rate Is Constrained by Seminal Fluid Availability in Bedbugs, Cimex lectularius
TLDR
The results suggest that male mating rate can be constrained by the availability of seminal fluids, and the idea that economic considerations in sexual conflict research might benefit from distinguishing between costs and benefits that are ejaculate dose-dependent and those that are frequency-dependent on the mating rate per se is discussed.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 23 REFERENCES
Costly traumatic insemination and a female counter-adaptation in bed bugs
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the spermalege efficiently reduces the direct costs of piercing trauma to females, and hence provides experimental evidence for a female counter–adaptation to a sexually antagonistic male trait.
Intrasexual mounting in the beetle Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.)
TLDR
The results of mate choice experiments suggested that the female mimicry of males hypothesis best explains the observed female mounting behaviour, and this result is consistent with the poor sex recognition hypothesis which is the most likely explanation for male and female intrasexual mating behaviour in many insect species.
Female‐Limited Polymorphism in the Copulatory Organ of a Traumatically Inseminating Insect
TLDR
It is proposed that some females mimic the bizarre male condition in order to reduce the frequency of costly traumatic inseminations in Afrocimex constrictus, the first example of a distinct female‐limited genital polymorphism.
SITUATION EXPLOITATION: HIGHER MALE MATING SUCCESS WHEN FEMALE RESISTANCE IS REDUCED BY FEEDING
TLDR
Choice trials using unfed and either fed or experimentally enlarged but unfed females showed that the increased postfeeding body volume of females attracted moremale mating attempts, strongly reduced female resistance to male mating attempts and resulted in a net increase in female mating rate, suggesting increased mating success in a situation that females cannot avoid because it is naturally selected.
Exploitation of Sexual Signals by Predators and Parasitoids
TLDR
Signals used to attract mates are often conspicuous to predators and parasites, and their evolution via sexual selection is expected to be opposed by viability selection, while plants emit attractants analogous to secondary sex characters in animals, and may also be vulnerable to signal exploitation.
Effects of Environmental and Social Conditions on Homosexual Pairing in the Japanese Beetle (Popillia japonica Newman)
TLDR
The data suggest that homosexual pairs are a result of males mistaking other males for females, and it is hypothesized that the environmental and social factors cause changes in homosexual pairing through their effects on the frequency of pair formation and pair duration.
Traumatic insemination and sexual conflict in the bed bug Cimex lectularius
TLDR
It is shown for the first time, to the authors' knowledge, that traumatic insemination results in (i) last-male sperm precedence, (ii) suboptimal remating frequencies for the maintenance of female fertility, and (iii) reduced longevity and reproductive success in females.
Trauma, disease and collateral damage: conflict in cimicids
  • M. Siva-jothy
  • Biology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2006
TLDR
Key aspects of the reproductive anatomy and behaviour of C. lectularius that underpin the nature of the conflict over mating rate in this species are examined and the consequences of traumatic insemination for female fitness are examined.
Reducing a cost of traumatic insemination: female bedbugs evolve a unique organ
TLDR
The results support the ‘defence against pathogens’ hypothesis, suggesting that the evolution of this unique cimicid organ resulted, at least partly, from selection to reduce the costs of mating-associated infection.
Dominance in assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis)
TLDR
Theoretical models of social exchange were not considered useful in predicting the complex patterns of grooming, mounting, and dominance seen in the present group and they must be empirically tested.
...
1
2
3
...