Homology of arthropod anterior appendages revealed by Hox gene expression in a sea spider

@article{Jager2006HomologyOA,
  title={Homology of arthropod anterior appendages revealed by Hox gene expression in a sea spider},
  author={Muriel Jager and J{\'e}r{\^o}me Murienne and C{\'e}line Clabaut and Jean S. Deutsch and Herv{\'e} Le Guyader and Micha{\"e}l Manuel},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={441},
  pages={506-508}
}
Arthropod head segments offer a paradigm for understanding the diversification of form during evolution, as a variety of morphologically diverse appendages have arisen from them. There has been long-running controversy, however, concerning which head appendages are homologous among arthropods, and from which ancestral arrangement they have been derived. This controversy has recently been rekindled by the proposition that the probable ancestral arrangement, with appendages on the first head… Expand
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