Homologies of Inferior Ovaries and Septal Nectaries in Monocotyledons

@article{Rudall2002HomologiesOI,
  title={Homologies of Inferior Ovaries and Septal Nectaries in Monocotyledons},
  author={P. Rudall},
  journal={International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  year={2002},
  volume={163},
  pages={261 - 276}
}
  • P. Rudall
  • Published 2002
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Plant Sciences
The range of gynoecial structure in monocotyledons is examined in the context of current understanding of phylogenetic relationships, with particular reference to lilioid monocots, especially Asparagales. Major variations in gynoecial structure in lilioids include degree of syncarpy, occurrence and position of septal nectaries, and hypogyny versus epigyny. Structural evidence from septal nectaries, combined with recent molecular phylogenetic studies, indicates multiple origins of epigyny within… Expand
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Roles of synorganisation, zygomorphy and heterotopy in floral evolution: the gynostemium and labellum of orchids and other lilioid monocots
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  • Biology, Medicine
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Comparisons to Corsia and Pauridia indicate that there are at least two key genes or sets of genes controlling adnation, adaxial stamen suppression and labellum development in lilioid monocots; at least one is responsible for stamen adnation to the style (i.e. gynostemium formation), and another controls adaxia stamens suppression and adaxianlabellum formation in orchids. Expand
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