Homocysteine-lowering treatment: an overview

@article{Stehouwer2001HomocysteineloweringTA,
  title={Homocysteine-lowering treatment: an overview},
  author={Coen D. A. Stehouwer and Coen van Guldener},
  journal={Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy},
  year={2001},
  volume={2},
  pages={1449 - 1460}
}
Elevated fasting plasma concentrations of homocysteine have a high prevalence in subjects with cardiovascular disease and have also been associated with an increased risk of atherothrombosis in most, but not all, prospective studies. The most frequent causes of hyperhomocysteinaemia are genetic defects, such as cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) deficiency, deficiencies of folic acid and/or vitamin B12, renal failure and interference in homocysteine metabolism by drugs or metabolic alterations. In… 
Comparative Effects of Atorvastatin, Simvastatin, and Fenofibrate on Serum Homocysteine Levels in Patients with Primary Hyperlipidemia
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A REVIEW ON HYPERHOMOCYSTEINEMIA AND ITS RISK FACTORS
TLDR
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TLDR
The cardiovascular risk associated with hyperhomocysteinemia is significant, but modest and probably differs between populations, and studies that have examined the relationship between plasma homocysteine and arterial stiffness parameters have shown heterogenous results.
Folic acid supplement decreases the homocysteine increasing effect of filtered coffee. A randomised placebo-controlled study
Objective: Elevated levels of plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) are identified as independent risk factors for coronary heart disease and for fetal neural tube defects. tHcy levels are negatively
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TLDR
B vitamin supplementation in patients with various forms of dementia did not influence neopterin concentrations, which indicates that the degree of immune activation and inflammation remained unchanged.
Total Level of Serum Homocysteine in Males and Females with Coronary Heart Disease of Different Age Groups
TLDR
It is concluded that plasma level of homocysteine is significantly elevated in diabetic coronary heart disease female patients above 50 years old and significantly Elevated in nondiabetic coronaryHeart disease males and female patients, t hus nondi diabetic coronaryheart disease male andFemale patients and diabetic coronary female patien ts are at high risk of vascular diseases.
Starting with Rosuvastatin in Primary Hyperlipidemia—
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Rsuvastatin at 10 mg/day is a highly effective, safe, and well-tolerated monotherapy option for patients with primary hyperlipidemia, with a favorable antiinflammatory potential and nondeteriorating effects on renal function.
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