Homo sapiens Is as Homo sapiens Was

@article{Shea2011HomoSI,
  title={Homo sapiens Is as Homo sapiens Was},
  author={John J. Shea},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={2011},
  volume={52},
  pages={1 - 35}
}
  • J. Shea
  • Published 26 January 2011
  • Psychology
  • Current Anthropology
Paleolithic archaeologists conceptualize the uniqueness of Homo sapiens in terms of “behavioral modernity,” a quality often conflated with behavioral variability. The former is qualitative, essentialist, and a historical artifact of the European origins of Paleolithic research. The latter is a quantitative, statistically variable property of all human behavior, not just that of Ice Age Europeans. As an analytical construct, behavioral modernity is deeply flawed at all epistemological levels… 
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