Homo naledi pelvic remains from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa.

@article{Vansickle2018HomoNP,
  title={Homo naledi pelvic remains from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa.},
  author={Caroline Vansickle and Zachary Cofran and Daniel Garc{\'i}a‐Mart{\'i}nez and Scott A. Williams and Steven Emilio Churchill and Lee R. Berger and John Hawks},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2018},
  volume={125},
  pages={
          122-136
        }
}

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Immature remains and the first partial skeleton of a juvenile Homo naledi, a late Middle Pleistocene hominin from South Africa

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The thigh and leg of Homo naledi.

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Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

Homo naledi is a previously-unknown species of extinct hominin discovered within the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa. This species is characterized

Associated ilium and femur from Koobi Fora, Kenya, and postcranial diversity in early Homo.

New fossil remains of Homo naledi from the Lesedi Chamber, South Africa

The Lesedi Chamber skeletal sample extends the knowledge of the morphology and variation of H. naledi, and evidence from both recovery localities shows a consistent pattern of differentiation from other hominin species.

A Partial Pelvis of Australopithecus sediba

Although it had a small brain and skull, Australopithecus sediba shows some human-like features in its reconstructed pelvis, suggesting that the birthing of larger-brained babies was not driving the evolution of the pelvis at this time.

Pelvic Morphology in Homo erectus and Early Homo

These discoveries suggest that the “femoropelvic complex” characteristic of H. erectus emerged after the divergence of various lineages of early Homo (that is, it is not plesiomorphic for the genus) and raise questions about the role that evolutionary change in brain size in the genus Homo played in the emergence of derived features seen in the pelvis of modern humans.

A complete human pelvis from the Middle Pleistocene of Spain

The Middle Pleistocene site of Sima de los Huesos in Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain, has yielded around 2,500 fossils from at least 33different hominid individuals, one of which is probably the primitive condition from which modern humans departed.

Middle Pleistocene lower back and pelvis from an aged human individual from the Sima de los Huesos site, Spain

A revised reconstruction of Pelvis 1, together with the current fossil evidence, confirms the previous hypothesis that the morphology of this pelvis represents the primitive pattern within the genus Homo, and argues that this primitive pattern is also characterized by sexual dimorphism in the pelvic canal shape, implying complicated deliveries.

The foot of Homo naledi

The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and derived ankle and calcaneocuboid joints, thus providing further evidence of locomotor diversity within both the hominin clade and the genus Homo.

The hand of Homo naledi

The finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension, and are considered adaptive for intensified manual manipulation.
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