Homo erectus made world's oldest doodle 500,000 years ago

@article{Callaway2014HomoEM,
  title={Homo erectus made world's oldest doodle 500,000 years ago},
  author={Ewen Callaway},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2014}
}
Shell markings are the oldest abstract signs ever discovered. 
2 Citations
The Cradle of Humanity: A Psychological and Phenomenological Perspective
We present an account of the evolutionary development of the experiences of empathy that marked the beginning of morality and art. We argue that aesthetic and moral capacities provided an importantExpand

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Homo erectus at Trinil on Java used shells for tool production and engraving
TLDR
A fossil freshwater shell assemblage from the Hauptknochenschicht of Trinil (Java, Indonesia) is reported, indicating that the engraving was made by Homo erectus, and that it is considerably older than the oldest geometric engravings described so far. Expand
Pleistocene cave art from Sulawesi, Indonesia
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It can now be demonstrated that humans were producing rock art by ∼40 kyr ago at opposite ends of the Pleistocene Eurasian world. Expand
A rock engraving made by Neanderthals in Gibraltar
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Geochemical analysis of the epigenetic coating over the engravings and experimental replication show that the engraving was made before accumulation of the archaeological layers, and that most of the lines composing the design were made by repeatedly and carefully passing a pointed lithic tool into the grooves, excluding the possibility of an unintentional or utilitarian origin. Expand
U-Series Dating of Paleolithic Art in 11 Caves in Spain
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Dating of calcite crusts overlying art in Spanish caves shows that painting began more than 40,000 years ago, revealing either that cave art was a part of the cultural repertoire of the first anatomically modern humans in Europe or that perhaps Neandertals also engaged in painting caves. Expand