Homo erectus Calvarium from the Pleistocene of Java

@article{Baba2003HomoEC,
  title={Homo erectus Calvarium from the Pleistocene of Java},
  author={Hisao Baba and Fachroel Aziz and Yousuke Kaifu and Gen Suwa and Reiko T. Kono and Teuku Jacob},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={299},
  pages={1384 - 1388}
}
A Homo erectus calvarium [Sambungmacan 4 (Sm 4)] was recovered from Pleistocene sediments at Sambungmacan in central Java. Micro–computed tomography analysis shows a modern human–like cranial base flexion associated with a low platycephalic vault, implying that the evolution of human cranial globularity was independent of cranial base flexion. The overall morphology of Sm 4 is intermediate between that of earlier and later Javanese Homo erectus; apparent morphological specializations are more… 
First Certain Fossil Record of Orlitia borneensis (Testudines: Geoemydidae) from the Pleistocene of Central Java, Indonesia
TLDR
The present findings suggest that O. borneensis had a wider distribution in the past, but the Java population would have become extinct by the end of the Middle Pleistocene.
Natural history of Homo erectus.
  • S. Antón
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2003
TLDR
It is argued that H. erectus is a hominin, notable for its increased body size, that originates in the latest Pliocene/earliest Pleistocene of Africa and quickly disperses into Western and Eastern Asia and is also an increasingly derived homin in with several regional morphs sustained by intermittent isolation, particularly in Southeast Asia.
Middle Pleistocene human cranium from Tangshan (Nanjing), Southeast China: a new reconstruction and comparisons with Homo erectus from Eurasia and Africa.
TLDR
The results indicate that this middle Pleistocene hominid fossil should be referred to as Homo erectus, and the sharing of typical Homo erectionus features with African and European counterparts demonstrates that Homo erectu is a widely distributed lineage that evolved during the million years after its Pliocene origins.
Defining Homo erectus
  • K. Baab
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 2013
Pithecanthropus (now Homo) erectus was first recognized as a species by Eugene Dubois in the 1890s from fossils at the Indonesian site of Trinil. Additional finds from Indonesia and then China
A Complete Skull from Dmanisi, Georgia, and the Evolutionary Biology of Early Homo
TLDR
The Dmanisi sample, which now comprises five crania, provides direct evidence for wide morphological variation within and among early Homo paleodemes, implying the existence of a single evolving lineage of early Homo, with phylogeographic continuity across continents.
Hominid mandibular remains from Sangiran: 1952-1986 collection.
Eight hominid mandibular and associated dental remains discovered between 1952-1986 from the Early Pleistocene deposits of Sangiran, Central Java, are described. Although the specimens are surface
First Homo erectus from Turkey and implications for migrations into temperate Eurasia.
TLDR
Evidence for TB in the new specimen supports the thesis that reduced UVR was one of the many climatic variables presenting an adaptive challenge to ancient hominins during their migration into the temperate regions of Europe and Asia.
Middle Pleistocene Hominin Teeth from Longtan Cave, Hexian, China
TLDR
It is suggested that the primitive-derived gradients of the Asian hominins cannot be satisfactorily fitted along a chronological sequence, suggesting complex evolutionary scenarios with the coexistence and/or survival of different lineages in Eurasia.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 20 REFERENCES
Latest Homo erectus of Java: Potential Contemporaneity with Homo sapiens in Southeast Asia
TLDR
Electron spin resonance (ESR) and mass spectrometric U-series dating of fossil bovid teeth collected from the hominid-bearing levels at these sites gave mean ages of 27 ± 2 to 53.3 ± 4 thousand years ago; the range in ages reflects uncertainties in uranium migration histories.
Remains of Homo erectus from Bouri, Middle Awash, Ethiopia
TLDR
Daka's resemblance to Asian counterparts indicates that the early African and Eurasian fossil hominids represent demes of a widespread palaeospecies and Daka's anatomical intermediacy between earlier and later African fossils provides evidence of evolutionary change.
The Sambungmacan 3 Homo erectus calvaria: A comparative morphometric and morphological analysis
TLDR
Morphological comparisons of Sambungmacan (Sm) 3 with a selection of Homo erectus fossils revealed its greatest similarity to specimens from Ngandong and the Sm 1 calvaria, suggesting that it was a female.
Paleomagnetic dates of hominid remains from Yuanmou, China, and other Asian sites.
Two hominid upper central incisors found in the Yuanmou Basin in southwest China in 1965 have affinities with Homo erectus fossils from Zhoukoudian, but exhibit primitive features. The Yuanmou
Early Pleistocene 40Ar/39Ar ages for Bapang Formation hominins, Central Jawa, Indonesia
TLDR
This work investigates the sedimentary framework and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age for volcanic deposits in the southeast quadrant of the Sangiran dome, and identifies a sequence of sedimentary cycles in which H. erectus fossils are associated with epiclastic pumice.
Anterior sphenoid in modern humans
TLDR
It turns out that the anterior sphenoid in modern humans is no shorter than in archaic Homo, and ASL was incorrectly estimated in those archaic fossil crania in which these landmarks are unambiguously preserved.
The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens
TLDR
Cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils is examined by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp.
Modern human origins: progress and prospects.
  • C. Stringer
  • Psychology
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2002
TLDR
It is concluded that a recent African origin can be supported for H. sapiens, morphologically, behaviourally and genetically, but that more evidence will be needed, both from Africa and elsewhere, before an absolute African origin for the authors' species and its behavioural characteristics can be established and explained.
Evolutionary significance of cranial variation in Asian Homo erectus.
  • S. Antón
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2002
TLDR
The revised radiometric chronologies for hominid sites in Asia and their relation to new oxygen isotope curves are synthesized and suggest substantial opportunities in the later Pleistocene for both regional isolation and gene flow between hominids in mainland and Southeast Asia.
...
...