Hominids and hybrids: the place of Neanderthals in human evolution.

@article{Tattersall1999HominidsAH,
  title={Hominids and hybrids: the place of Neanderthals in human evolution.},
  author={I. Tattersall and J. Schwartz},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1999},
  volume={96 13},
  pages={
          7117-9
        }
}
  • I. Tattersall, J. Schwartz
  • Published 1999
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
As the first extinct human relatives to have become known to science, the Neanderthals have assumed an almost iconic significance in human evolutionary studies: a significance that has, of course, been greatly enhanced by the very substantial fossil and behavioral record that has accumulated since the original Feldhofer Cave skullcap and partial skeleton were accidentally uncovered, on a pre-Darwinian August day in 1856, by lime miners working in Germany’s Neander Valley (1–3). Yet even now, 14… Expand
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