Holocene History of Cedar and Native Indian Cultures of the North American Pacific Coast

@article{Hebda1984HoloceneHO,
  title={Holocene History of Cedar and Native Indian Cultures of the North American Pacific Coast},
  author={R. Hebda and R. Mathewes},
  journal={Science},
  year={1984},
  volume={225},
  pages={711 - 713}
}
A comparison of paleobotanical records with archeological and ethnographic evidence from the Pacific Northwest shows a strong correlation between the expansion of Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) in coastal forests between 5000 and 2500 years ago and the evolution of a massive woodworking technology by native cultures. This suggests that an important component of cultural development was environmentally constrained until large cedar trees, the basic resource for canoe-building and plank-house… Expand
116 Citations
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 18 REFERENCES
The West Coast (Nootka) People (British Columbia Provincial Museum
  • 1983
The archaeology of Hesquiat Harbour: The archaeological utility of an ethnographically defined social unit
  • 1982
The Indigenous Archaeology of Yuquot, a Nootkan Outside Village (Publ. 39, Parks Canada History and Archaeology
  • 1980
A Water-Saturated Site on the Southern Mainland Coast of British Columbia. (National Museum of Canada
  • 1976
The Glenrose Cannery Site (National Museum of Canada
  • 1976
Wet Site Archaeology at Kwatna (National Museum Canada
  • 1976
...
1
2
...