History of the birth certificate: from inception to the future of electronic data

@article{Brumberg2012HistoryOT,
  title={History of the birth certificate: from inception to the future of electronic data},
  author={Heather Lynn Brumberg and Donna Dozor and Sergio G. Golombek},
  journal={Journal of Perinatology},
  year={2012},
  volume={32},
  pages={407-411}
}
Enumerations of people were carried out long before the birth of Jesus. Data related to births were recorded in church registers in England as early as the 1500s. However, not until the 1902 Act of Congress was the Bureau of Census established as a permanent agency to develop birth registration areas and a standard registration system. Although all states had birth records by 1919, the use of the standardized version was not uniformly adopted until the 1930's. In the 1989 US Standard Birth… Expand
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The impact of changes in information technology, welfare policy, and health care
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Achieving the full promise of the new technology will require more fundamental changes in institutions and policies and a reconceptualization of the birth certificate as part of a broader perinatal information system. Expand
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