Historical review: the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (Dl CO) and its membrane (Dm) and red cell (Θ·Vc) components

@article{Hughes2003HistoricalRT,
  title={Historical review: the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (Dl
 CO) and its membrane (Dm) and red cell ($\Theta$·Vc) components},
  author={John M. b. Hughes and David V. Bates},
  journal={Respiratory Physiology \& Neurobiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={138},
  pages={115-142}
}
  • J. HughesD. Bates
  • Published 14 November 2003
  • Medicine
  • Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology

Lung Diffusing Capacities (DL ) for Nitric Oxide (NO) and Carbon Monoxide (CO): The Evolving Story.

Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacities (DLNO and DLCO ) obey Fick's First Law of Diffusion and the basic principles of chemical kinetic theory. NO gas transfer is dominated by membrane

Lung Diffusing Capacities (DL ) for Nitric Oxide (NO) and Carbon Monoxide (CO): The Evolving Story.

From this R-F equation, DM for CO and Vc can be solved with simultaneous NO and CO inhalation, and recent mathematical modeling suggests that θ for NO is "effectively" infinite because NO reacts only with Hb in the outer 0.1 μM of the red cell.

Examination of the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DL(CO)) in relation to its KCO and VA components.

Kco and Va values should be available to clinicians, as fundamental to understanding the clinical implications of DL(CO).

The centenary (2015) of the transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TLCO): Marie Krogh's legacy

Whether or not the lungs actively secreted oxygen, particularly under stressful conditions (severe exertion, alveolar hypoxia), was an argument which continued for more than 50 years (1870–1923), and

Nitrogen monoxide and carbon monoxide transfer interpretation: state of the art

The state of the art in partitioning the CO diffusing capacity into its constitutive components is reported, with the goal to encourage further studies examining the sensitivity of DmCO and Vc to alterations observed in parenchymal diseases.

Reference equations for pulmonary diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide in adult Caucasians

The aim of this study was to determine reference equations for the combined measurement of diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) (DLCONO). In addition, we

Reference equations for pulmonary diffusing capacity of CO and NO

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine reference equations for the combined measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) diffusing capacity (DL,CO,NO). In addition, we wanted

Calculating alveolar capillary conductance and pulmonary capillary blood volume: comparing the multiple- and single-inspired oxygen tension methods.

It is concluded that the parameters used to calculate Dm and Vc values from the single-FiO2 method (using DlCO and DlNO) can significantly influence results and should be evaluated within individual laboratories to obtain optimal values.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 105 REFERENCES

A modification of the Krogh carbon monoxide breath holding technique for estimating the diffusing capacity of the lung; a comparison with three other methods.

There are at present four methods for assessing the pulmonary diffusing capacity, one using 02 (Do2) and three using CO (Dco) namely, the 02 method of Lilienthal, Riley, Proemmel, and Franke, the steady state CO method, and the CO breath holding technique of Krogh and Krogh as modified by some of the authors.

In defence of the carbon monoxide transfer coefficient Kco (TL/VA).

In this commentary, some mechanisms e.g. respiratory muscle weakness, lung resection, diffuse alveolar damage and airflow obstruction, which decrease or increase total lung capacity (TLC) are reviewed.

The single-breath carbon monoxide transfer test 25 years on: a reappraisal. 1--Physiological considerations.

The breath-holding or single-breath technique for the measurement of the diffusing capacity, or transfer factor, of the lung for carbon monoxide-which I shall symbolise as DL or DLco-in man is now 25

Effect of varying alveolar oxygen partial pressure on diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, membrane diffusing capacity and lung capillary blood volume.

It appears more likely that the minor reduction in DLNO that the authors have observed with falling PAO2 is due to diffusion rather than reaction limitation.

Carbon monoxide uptake and pulmonary diffusing capacity in normal subjects at rest and during exercise.

Carbon monoxide is peculiarly suitable for studies of gas diffusion across the pulmonary membrane because of the tenacity with which it is bound by hemoglobin after it has diffused into the red cells.

The components of the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in man dependent on alveolar volume.

The effect of alveolar volume (VA) on diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL), membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Qc) was investigated in 39 normal volunteers to

Diffusing capacity, membrane diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, pulmonary tissue volume, and cardiac output measured by a rebreathing technique.

The rebreathing technique provides a rapid, reliable, noninvasive method for estimating pulmonary hemodynamic parameters andEstimates of pulmonary tissue volume appeared to be quite reproducible and consistent; the values tended to be somewhat smaller and less variable among normal subjects than reported by other investigators.

Reference values of pulmonary diffusing capacity during exercise by a rebreathing technique.

It is concluded that QC is the most important determinant of the recruitment of diffusing capacity from rest to near-maximal exercise, and DLCO, DMCO, and VC increase linearly with respect to QC without evidence of reaching a plateau.

A simultaneous single breath measurement of pulmonary diffusing capacity with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide.

DLNO should be influenced much less by reaction with haemoglobin, and perhaps represents a better index for the diffusing capacity of the alveolar-capillary membrane (Dm) than DLCO.
...