Historical events as transformations of structures: Inventing revolution at the Bastille

@article{Sewell1996HistoricalEA,
  title={Historical events as transformations of structures: Inventing revolution at the Bastille},
  author={William H. Jr. Sewell},
  journal={Theory and Society},
  year={1996},
  volume={25},
  pages={841-881}
}
ConclusionJust as the taking of the Bastille led to a cascade of further events, so the theoretical reflections touched off by my analysis of that event has led to a cascade of further reflections. And as the analyst must draw an arbitrary boundary to establish analytical closure to an event, so must I bring to a close an article that still seems to me radically open and unfinished. I believe I have written enough to establish that thinking about historical events as I do here - that is… 
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