Historical and ecological determinants of genetic structure in arctic canids

@article{Carmichael2007HistoricalAE,
  title={Historical and ecological determinants of genetic structure in arctic canids},
  author={Lindsey E. Carmichael and Julia Krizan and John A. Nagy and Eva Fuglei and Mathieu Dumond and D W Johnson and Alasdair M. Veitch and Dominique Berteaux and Curtis Strobeck},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={16}
}
Wolves (Canis lupus) and arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) are the only canid species found throughout the mainland tundra and arctic islands of North America. Contrasting evolutionary histories, and the contemporary ecology of each species, have combined to produce their divergent population genetic characteristics. Arctic foxes are more variable than wolves, and both island and mainland fox populations possess similarly high microsatellite variation. These differences result from larger effective… 
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