Historical Writing in Medieval Wales

@inproceedings{Jones2013HistoricalWI,
  title={Historical Writing in Medieval Wales},
  author={Owain Wyn Jones and Huw Pryce.},
  year={2013}
}
This study focusses on the writing of history in medieval Wales. Its starting-point is a series of historical texts in Middle Welsh which, from the second quarter of the fourteenth century, begin to appear together in manuscripts to form a continuous history, termed the Welsh Historical Continuum. The central component of this sequence is a translation of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s influential history of the Britons. The main questions of the first part of the thesis are when and why these… Expand
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