Histopathologic Evaluation of Alopecias

@article{Sellheyer2006HistopathologicEO,
  title={Histopathologic Evaluation of Alopecias},
  author={K. Sellheyer and W. Bergfeld},
  journal={The American Journal of Dermatopathology},
  year={2006},
  volume={28},
  pages={236-259}
}
The alopecias can be broadly classified into nonscarring and scarring forms. The latter are divided into primary and secondary scarring types. In primary scarring alopecias, the hair follicle is the prime target of destruction as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias in which it is involved in a neighboring nonfollicular process that impinges upon the follicle and ultimately destroys it. After an initial overview and a critique on the concept of scarring versus nonscarring, we outline in… Expand
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