Histological and Micro-CT Evidence of Stigmatic Rostellum Receptivity Promoting Auto-Pollination in the Madagascan Orchid Bulbophyllum bicoloratum

@article{Gamisch2013HistologicalAM,
  title={Histological and Micro-CT Evidence of Stigmatic Rostellum Receptivity Promoting Auto-Pollination in the Madagascan Orchid Bulbophyllum bicoloratum},
  author={Alexander Gamisch and Yannick M. Staedler and J{\"u}rg Sch{\"o}nenberger and Gunter Alexander Fischer and Hans Peter Comes},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2013},
  volume={8}
}
Background The rostellum, a projecting part of the gynostemium in orchid flowers, separates the anther(s) from the stigma and thus commonly prevents auto-pollination. Nonetheless, as a modified (usually distal) portion of the median stigma lobe, the rostellum has been frequently invoked of having re-gained a stigmatic function in rare cases of orchid auto-pollination. Here it is shown that a newly discovered selfing variant of Madagascan Bulbophyllum bicoloratum has evolved a modified rostellum… Expand
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