Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists Do Not Alter Serum Ethanol Levels in Fed, Nonalcoholic Men

@article{Raufman1993Histamine2RA,
  title={Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists Do Not Alter Serum Ethanol Levels in Fed, Nonalcoholic Men},
  author={Jean-Pierre Raufman and Vincent Notar-Francesco and Robert D Raffaniello and Eugene Straus},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={1993},
  volume={118},
  pages={488-494}
}
Histamine-2 (H-2) receptor antagonists, used primarily for the treatment of acid-peptic diseases, rank among the safest and most frequently used drugs in clinical medicine, and some of these agents are now poised to go over the counter [1]. As a consequence of similar efficacy, there has been little basis to choose among the four drugs currently available in the United States. Recently, however, data have been presented to suggest that several of these agents may be dangerous. We refer to… Expand
Do Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists Influence the Metabolism of Ethanol?
  • M. Levitt
  • Medicine
  • Annals of Internal Medicine
  • 1993
TLDR
It is concluded that the stomach probably is not an important site of ethanol metabolism and the interaction between H-2 antagonists and ethanol is clinically insignificant, and the iconoclastic notion that first-pass metabolism of ethanol occurs in the liver, not the gastric mucosa is presented. Expand
H2-Antagonists and Alcohol
TLDR
There are conflicting data on the existence of significant first-pass metabolism of alcohol (ethanol) in the human stomach and its inhibition by histamine H2-receptor antagonists and the significance of this interaction is not easy to resolve. Expand
Effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists on blood alcohol levels
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Cimetidine and ranitidine, but not the other H2RAs, can cause small elevations of serum alcohol level when alcohol and drug are administered concurrently, relative to accepted, legal definitions of intoxication. Expand
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  • D. Moody
  • Medicine
  • Expert opinion on drug safety
  • 2018
TLDR
There is circumstantial evidence to support the role of inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase has not been clearly defined, but further studies are required to elucidate the ability of H2-receptor antagonists to inhibit first-pass metabolism of ethanol. Expand
The effect of cimetidine on ethanol concentrations in fasting women and men after two different doses of alcohol.
TLDR
Cimetidine does not influence the ethanol concentration-time curve when ethanol is ingested on an empty stomach and Ethanol elimination rate was unchanged by cimetidine. Expand
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TLDR
Clinicians should counsel patients about the possibility of enhanced impairment resulting from concurrent administration of these 2 drugs, as chronic drinkers who drink after cimetidine administration will have higher concentrations of alcohol faster than social drinkers. Expand
Safety of acid-suppressing drugs
TLDR
It is concluded that antisecretory agents, by comparison with most other classes of drugs, are remarkably well tolerated. Expand
The tolerability and safety profile of famotidine.
TLDR
The excellent tolerability profile of famotidine observed during investigational trials has remained substantially unchanged during postmarketing experience and it is generally well tolerated in patients with cardiovascular, renal, or hepatic dysfunction or with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome who have tolerated doses up to 800 mg daily. Expand
Gastric ethanol metabolism and gastritis: interactions with other drugs, Helicobacter pylori, and antibiotic therapy (1957-1997)--a review.
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  • Medicine
  • Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research
  • 1997
TLDR
Because antibiotics were shown over the last 4 decades to effectively eliminate gastric ammonia, they should be considered for the routine treatment of such chronic gastritis in the way they are now being used for ulcer therapy. Expand
Does Ranitidine Affect Blood Alcohol Concentrations?
TLDR
Ranitidine is associated with small increases in blood alcohol concentrations in subjects given alcohol 0.15 g/kg under specific experimental conditions, and the pharmacokinetic effect seen with ranitidine was without apparent clinical or social significance. Expand
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