Hirsutism: An Evidence-Based Treatment Update

@article{Somani2014HirsutismAE,
  title={Hirsutism: An Evidence-Based Treatment Update},
  author={Najwa Somani and D N Turvy},
  journal={American Journal of Clinical Dermatology},
  year={2014},
  volume={15},
  pages={247-266}
}
BackgroundHirsutism has a relatively high prevalence among women. Depending upon societal and ethnic norms, it can cause significant psychosocial distress. Importantly, hirsutism may be associated with underlying disorders and co-morbidities. Hirsutism should not simply be looked upon as an issue of cosmesis. Patients require appropriate evaluation so that underlying etiologies and associated sequelae are recognized and managed. Treatment of hirsutism often requires a multidisciplinary approach… Expand
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TLDR
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