Hippocampal specialization of food-storing birds.

@article{Krebs1989HippocampalSO,
  title={Hippocampal specialization of food-storing birds.},
  author={John Richard Krebs and David F Sherry and Susan D. Healy and V Hugh Perry and Anthony L. Vaccarino},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1989},
  volume={86 4},
  pages={
          1388-92
        }
}
  • J. Krebs, D. Sherry, A. Vaccarino
  • Published 1 February 1989
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
In a study of 52 individuals belonging to 35 species or subspecies of passerine birds it was shown that the volume of the hippocampal complex relative to brain and body size is significantly larger in species that store food than in species that do not. Retrieval of stored food relies on an accurate and long-lasting spatial memory, and hippocampal damage disrupts memory for storage sites. The results suggest, therefore, that food-storing species of passerines have an enlarged hippocampal… 
Food-storing birds: adaptive specialization in brain and behaviour?
  • J. Krebs
  • Biology, Psychology
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 1990
TLDR
Among the passerine birds, species that store food have an enlarged hippocampal region (dorso-medial cortex), relative to brain and body size, when compared with the non-storers, and this specialization of brain structure is discussed in relation to behavioural studies.
The ecology of the avian brain: food‐storing memory and the hippocampus
TLDR
Four areas of study are discussed: comparative Studies of the brain, comparative studies of behaviour, developmental plasticity and seasonal changes in food storing and the hippocampus.
Memory and brain in food-storing birds: Space oddities or adaptive specializations?
TLDR
The evidence pertaining to a correlation between food-storing capability and the relative volume of the hippocampus is reviewed to determine whether or not food-hoarding birds have evolved adaptive specializations in brain and cognition.
Development of hippocampal specialisation in a food-storing bird
The hippocampal complex of food-storing birds.
TLDR
The volume of the hippocampal complex and the telencephalon is determined in 3 food-storing families and in 10 non-food-stored families and subfamilies of passerines to show that natural selection has led to a larger hippocampusal complex in birds that rely on memory to recover spatially dispersed food caches.
Development of hippocampal specialisation in a food-storing bird
TLDR
In the food-storing magpie, the relative volume of the adult hippocampus is significantly larger than that of nestlings, whilst in the jackdaw, adults and nestlings do not differ.
Seasonal variation in hippocampal volume in a food-storing bird, the black-capped chickadee.
TLDR
There is an association between the intensity of food hoarding and the volume of the hippocampal formation, which is involved in spatial memory for cached food items, in October than at any other time of the year.
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FOREWORD The problems of evolution rank among mankind's most enduring interests, and it is therefore not surprising that virtually every branch of biology and medicine has ramified in the direction