Highly reliable genetic identification of individual northern hairy‐nosed wombats from single remotely collected hairs: a feasible censusing method

@article{Sloane2000HighlyRG,
  title={Highly reliable genetic identification of individual northern hairy‐nosed wombats from single remotely collected hairs: a feasible censusing method},
  author={Mathew A. Sloane and Paul Sunnucks and Deryn L. Alpers and Luciano Bellagamba Beheregaray and A. C. Taylor},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2000},
  volume={9}
}
The highly endangered northern hairy‐nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus krefftii) is extremely difficult to study in the wild, and its numbers correspondingly difficult to estimate. Disturbance to the animals caused by trapping and radio‐tracking may not only constitute an excessive risk to the population’s viability, but may also yield biased data. The results of a pilot study are presented, which clearly show noninvasive genotyping to be a highly feasible and reliable alternative censusing method for… 
GENOTYPING OF “CAPTURED” HAIRS REVEALS BURROW-USE AND RANGING BEHAVIOR OF SOUTHERN HAIRY-NOSED WOMBATS
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The thoroughness and evenness of this study's sampling strategy was markedly effective for this species, as, with appropriate modification and optimization, it will likely be for other shy and cryptic organisms.
Demographic monitoring of an entire species (the northern hairy‐nosed wombat, Lasiorhinus krefftii) by genetic analysis of non‐invasively collected material
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A mark‐recapture study was conducted in the sole remaining L. krefftii population, based on microsatellite identification of individuals and their gender from DNA in remotely collected single hairs, which suggests an increase in population size over the previous estimate of 65, although the estimates did not differ significantly.
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An ongoing increase in the population size at Epping Forest National Park is found, supported by healthy levels of reproduction despite periods of poor environmental conditions, notwithstanding the finding that cumulative monthly rainfall six months prior to sampling influenced birth rates.
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TLDR
The utility of the DNA-based hair-sampling method to identify spotted-tailed quoll individuals and for surveying local populations is demonstrated and improvements to the hair- Sampling method should be considered to enhance sampling efficiency to allow the enumeration of local populations.
Genetic marker investigation of the source and impact of predation on a highly endangered species
TLDR
Analysis of DNA recovered from six carcasses and a section of intestine found nearby identified seven individual wombats, the identity of which was inferred from a genotype database prepared from animals sampled during trapping programmes, suggesting female‐biased predation rates are unlikely to be the cause of the current male‐biased population sex ratio.
Non-invasive genetic sampling of faecal material and hair from the grey-headed flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)
TLDR
The results of a pilot study investigating non-invasive DNA sampling of the grey-headed flying-fox, a threatened species that is restricted to the east coast of Australia, successfully extracted DNA from fresh scats and hair, each of which was of sufficient quality for amplifying mitochondrial DNA markers and microsatellites.
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