Highly Unsaturated (n-3) Fatty Acids, but Not α-Linolenic, Conjugated Linoleic or γ-Linolenic Acids, Reduce Tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ Mice

@article{Petrik2000HighlyU,
  title={Highly Unsaturated (n-3) Fatty Acids, but Not $\alpha$-Linolenic, Conjugated Linoleic or $\gamma$-Linolenic Acids, Reduce Tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ Mice},
  author={Melissa B. Hansen Petrik and Michael F. Mcentee and Benjamin T. Johnson and Mark Gerard Obukowicz and Jay Whelan},
  journal={Journal of Nutrition},
  year={2000},
  volume={130},
  pages={2434-2443}
}
We showed previously that dietary eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA, 20:5(n-3)] is antitumorigenic in the APC:(Min/+) mouse, a genetic model of intestinal tumorigenesis. Only a few studies have evaluated the effects of dietary fatty acids, including EPA and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, 22:6(n-3)], in this animal model and none have evaluated the previously touted antitumorigenicity of alpha-linolenic acid [ALA, 18:3(n-3)], conjugated linoleic acid [CLA, 77% 18:2(n-7)], or gamma-linolenic acid [GLA, 18:3… Expand
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