Higher vitellogenin concentrations in honey bee workers may be an adaptation to life in temperate climates

@article{Amdam2005HigherVC,
  title={Higher vitellogenin concentrations in honey bee workers may be an adaptation to life in temperate climates},
  author={Gro V Amdam and Kari Norberg and Stig W. Omholt and Per Kryger and A P Lourenço and M{\'a}rcia Maria Gentile Bitondi and Zil{\'a} Luz Paulino Sim{\~o}es},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2005},
  volume={52},
  pages={316-319}
}
The honey bee originated in tropical Africa and later dispersed to northern Europe. It has been suggested that a higher hemolymph storage capacity for the glycolipoprotein vitellogenin evolved in temperate regions, and that the trait constitutes an adaptation to a strongly seasonal environment. We have investigated whether the relative vitellogenin levels of European and African honey bees are in accordance with this hypothesis. Our data indicate that European workers have a higher set-point… CONTINUE READING

From This Paper

Figures, tables, and topics from this paper.
20 Citations
25 References
Similar Papers

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 20 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 25 references

Origin and evolutionary history of the honeybees Apis

  • T. W. Culliney
  • Bee World 64: 29–38
  • 1983
Highly Influential
1 Excerpt

Changes in weight of the pharyngeal gland and haemolymph titres of juvenile hormone and vitellogenin in worker honeybees

  • P. Fluri, M. Lüscher, H. Wille, L. Gerig
  • J. Insect Physiol. 28: 61–68
  • 1982
Highly Influential
9 Excerpts

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…