• Corpus ID: 2899039

Higher rate of serious perinatal events in non-Western women in Denmark.

@article{BrehmChristensen2016HigherRO,
  title={Higher rate of serious perinatal events in non-Western women in Denmark.},
  author={Marianne Brehm Christensen and Sarah Fredsted Villadsen and Tom Weber and C. Wilken-jensen and Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen},
  journal={Danish medical journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={63 3}
}
INTRODUCTION To elucidate possible mechanisms behind the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality among migrants in Denmark, this study aimed to analyse characteristics of perinatal deaths at Hvidovre Hospital 2006-2010 - -according to maternal country of origin. METHODS We identified children born at Hvidovre Hospital who died perinatally and included the patient files in a series of case studies. Our data were linked to data from population-covering registries in Statistics Denmark… 

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