Higher offspring survival among Tibetan women with high oxygen saturation genotypes residing at 4,000 m.

@article{Beall2004HigherOS,
  title={Higher offspring survival among Tibetan women with high oxygen saturation genotypes residing at 4,000 m.},
  author={C. Beall and K. Song and R. Elston and M. Goldstein},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2004},
  volume={101 39},
  pages={
          14300-4
        }
}
  • C. Beall, K. Song, +1 author M. Goldstein
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Here we test the hypothesis that high-altitude native resident Tibetan women with genotypes for high oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and thus less physiological hypoxic stress, have higher Darwinian fitness than women with low oxygen saturation genotypes. Oxygen saturation and genealogical data were collected from residents of 905 households in 14 villages at altitudes of 3,800-4,200 m in the Tibet Autonomous Region along with fertility histories from 1,749 women. Segregation analysis… Expand
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