High temperatures in the terrestrial mid-latitudes during the early Palaeogene

@article{Naafs2018HighTI,
  title={High temperatures in the terrestrial mid-latitudes during the early Palaeogene},
  author={B. David A. Naafs and Megan Rohrssen and Gordon N. Inglis and Outi L{\"a}hteenoja and Sarah J. Feakins and Margaret E. Collinson and Elizabeth M. Kennedy and P. Singh and M. P. Singh and Daniel J. Lunt and Richard D. Pancost},
  journal={Nature Geoscience},
  year={2018},
  volume={11},
  pages={766-771}
}
The early Paleogene (56–48 Myr) provides valuable information about the Earth’s climate system in an equilibrium high $$p_{{\rm{CO}}_2}$$pCO2 world. High ocean temperatures have been reconstructed for this greenhouse period, but land temperature estimates have been cooler than expected. This mismatch between marine and terrestrial temperatures has been difficult to reconcile. Here we present terrestrial temperature estimates from a newly calibrated branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether… 

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