High-speed video analysis of wing-snapping in two manakin clades (Pipridae: Aves)

@article{Bostwick2003HighspeedVA,
  title={High-speed video analysis of wing-snapping in two manakin clades (Pipridae: Aves)},
  author={Kimberly S. Bostwick and R. Prum},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2003},
  volume={206},
  pages={3693 - 3706}
}
SUMMARY Basic kinematic and detailed physical mechanisms of avian, non-vocal sound production are both unknown. Here, for the first time, field-generated high-speed video recordings and acoustic analyses are used to test numerous competing hypotheses of the kinematics underlying sonations, or non-vocal communicative sounds, produced by two genera of Pipridae, Manacus and Pipra (Aves). Eleven behaviorally and acoustically distinct sonations are characterized, five of which fall into a specific… Expand
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