High river temperature reduces survival of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) approaching spawning grounds and exacerbates female mortality

@article{Martins2012HighRT,
  title={High river temperature reduces survival of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) approaching spawning grounds and exacerbates female mortality},
  author={Eduardo G. Martins and Scott G. Hinch and David A. Patterson and Merran J. Hague and Steven J. Cooke and Kristina M. Miller and David Robichaud and Karl K. English and Anthony P. Farrell},
  journal={Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences},
  year={2012},
  volume={69},
  pages={330-342}
}
Recent studies have shown that warm temperatures reduce survival of adult migrating sockeye salmon (Oncorhyn- chus nerka), but knowledge gaps exist on where high-temperature-related mortality occurs along the migration and whether females and males are differentially impacted by river temperature. In this study, we monitored 437 radio-tagged Fraser River sockeye salmon and used capture-mark-recapture modelling approaches to investigate whether river thermal condi- tions differentially influence… 

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