High-quality male field crickets invest heavily in sexual display but die young

@article{Hunt2004HighqualityMF,
  title={High-quality male field crickets invest heavily in sexual display but die young},
  author={John Hunt and Robert C. Brooks and Michael D. Jennions and Michael J. Smith and Caroline L. Bentsen and Luc F. Bussi{\`e}re},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={432},
  pages={1024-1027}
}
Only high-quality males can bear the costs of an extreme sexual display. As a consequence, such males are not only more attractive, but they often live longer than average. Recent theory predicts, however, that high-quality males should sometimes invest so heavily in sexual displays that they die sooner than lower quality males. We manipulated the phenotypic quality of field crickets, Teleogryllus commodus, by altering the protein content of their diet. Here we show that nymphs and adult… Expand
Diet, sex, and death in field crickets
TLDR
Evidence is provided that the cost of mating in this cricket species is both diet and sex-dependent, and that the underlying causes of sex differences in life-history traits such as lifespan and senescence can be complex. Expand
Condition Dependence of Male Life Span and Calling Effort in a Field Cricket
TLDR
These findings suggest that male quality and survival are positively correlated, but more tests of this hypothesis are needed. Expand
Color in a Long-Lived Tropical Seabird
TLDR
Using long-term data, it is found that as individuals age and accumulate the negative effects of breeding effort, foot color deteriorates and there seems to be a trade-off between female ornamentation and fecundity mediated by carotenoid availability, suggesting that males should not prefer highly ornamented females that invest heavily in coloration incurring fertility costs. Expand
Chapter 5 – Color in a Long-Lived Tropical Seabird: Sexual Selection in a Life-History Context
TLDR
It is found that as individuals age and accumulate the negative effects of breeding effort, foot color deteriorates, and there seems to be a trade-off between female ornamentation and fecundity mediated by carotenoid availability, suggesting that males should not prefer highly ornamented females that invest heavily in coloration incurring fecundities costs. Expand
Body size and lifespan are condition dependent in the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, but not sexually selected traits
TLDR
Interestingly, although the research focused on measuring the effect of resources on both pre- and postcopulatory traits in male mealworm beetles as well as their effect on their mates’ relative fitness, precopulatory traits such as pheromone attractiveness andPostcopulatory trait such as ejaculate transfer were not found. Expand
A low-cost sexual ornament reliably signals male condition in the fiddler crab Uca beebei
TLDR
Results confirm that pillars reliably signal a male’s condition, as measured by his ability to maintain a blood glucose level necessary for costly courtship, even though the construction of a pillar has minimal energetic cost. Expand
Courtship effort is a better predictor of mating success than ornamentation for male wolf spiders
TLDR
This work found courtship intensity to be the only aspect of male courtship that influenced copulation success--males that copulated displayed more leg raises per second than those that did not copulate. Expand
Crickets increase sexual signalling and sperm protection but live shorter in the presence of rivals
  • J. C. Noguera
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of evolutionary biology
  • 2019
TLDR
This study suggests that intrasexual competition may impose additional oxidative costs during reproduction for males, with negative consequences on lifespan, and highlights the role of oxidative stress as a physiological mechanism underlying the trade‐off between reproduction‐longevity and through which sexual selection may contribute to the evolution of senescence patterns. Expand
Residual reproductive value and male mating success: older males do better
TLDR
Investigating male butterfly mating success in relation to age, nutritional status, assay condition and wing damage concludes that the life-history perspective is a fruitful one for gaining a better understanding of the evolution of sexually selected characters and the predictions derived from contest theory do also apply to male mating success. Expand
Condition dependence of female choosiness in a field cricket
TLDR
The condition dependence of female preferences (preference function and choosiness) for male calling effort in G. pennsylvanicus is tested, with respect to the possibility that female G. penny Sylvanicus may be foraging for direct benefits when they choose their mates. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
Female choice selects for lifetime lekking performance in black grouse males
TLDR
It is concluded that females can use territory position as a signal that conveys information of a male's lifetime performance that combines lekking effort and longevity, and may overcome the problem of male allocations varying in time, without the need to pay costs associated with repeated sampling. Expand
Condition-dependent signaling affects male sexual attractiveness in field crickets, Gryllus campestris
TLDR
Food-supplemented males attracted more females than did control males, and their higher attractiveness was partly explained by their superior calling rate, which indicates condition-dependent signaling as an important determinant of the sexual attractiveness of males to females under natural condition. Expand
Trade-offs between life-history traits and a secondary sexual character in male collared flycatchers
TLDR
This is the first experimental demonstration that life-history traits and secondary sexual characters trade off against each other, and support the suggestion that the life- history consequences of sexual ornaments are important in their evolution. Expand
Changes in expression and honesty of sexual signalling over the reproductive lifetime of sticklebacks
  • U. Candolin
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2000
TLDR
Three–spined stickleback males (Gasterosteus aculeatus), who have a single breeding season during which they breed repeatedly, change their red nuptial coloration over the season depending on their body size at the start of breeding. Expand
Male mating success and risk of predation in a wolf spider: a balance between sexual and natural selection?
TLDR
It was evident that both increased mate-searching activity and higher drumming activity benefited males by increasing their mating success, but at the same time natural selection provokes direct balancing costs on the same traits. Expand
Sexually Selected Traits and Adult Survival: A Meta-Analysis
TLDR
In general, males with larger ornaments or weapons, greater body size, or higher rates of courtship showed greater survivorship or longevity, suggesting that male investment in sexually selected traits is not fixed but varies in relation to the ability to pay the underlying costs of expressing these characters. Expand
Testing the assumptions of conditional handicap theory: costs and condition dependence of a sexually selected trait
  • J. Kotiaho
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2000
TLDR
It is demonstrated that sexual signalling in H. rubrofasciata is condition dependent and costly, thus supporting conditional handicap models of sexual selection. Expand
The cost of reproduction and sexual selection
TLDR
The examples presented show that the cost of sexual selection could be mediated in many ways and it is suggested that future studies should focus on such mechanisms. Expand
Nutritional effects on male calling behaviour in the variable field cricket
TLDR
It is suggested that males invest any excess energy above their basic maintenance requirements in the production of call types that increase their attractiveness to females. Expand
Early mortality surge in protein-deprived females causes reversal of sex differential of life expectancy in Mediterranean fruit flies.
TLDR
Experiments based on over 400,000 medflies revealed that females maintained on a normal diet (sucrose plus protein) have a higher life expectancy than males maintained onA normal diet, but this sex differential reverses under protein deprivation, causing the reversal of the male-female life expectancy differential. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...