High prices for rare species can drive large populations extinct: the anthropogenic Allee effect revisited.

@article{Holden2017HighPF,
  title={High prices for rare species can drive large populations extinct: the anthropogenic Allee effect revisited.},
  author={Matthew H Holden and E. McDonald-Madden},
  journal={Journal of theoretical biology},
  year={2017},
  volume={429},
  pages={
          170-180
        }
}
  • Matthew H Holden, E. McDonald-Madden
  • Published 2017
  • Geography, Medicine, Biology
  • Journal of theoretical biology
  • Consumer demand for plant and animal products threatens many populations with extinction. The anthropogenic Allee effect (AAE) proposes that such extinctions can be caused by prices for wildlife products increasing with species rarity. This price-rarity relationship creates financial incentives to extract the last remaining individuals of a population, despite higher search and harvest costs. The AAE has become a standard approach for conceptualizing the threat of economic markets on endangered… CONTINUE READING
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