High potential iron–sulfur proteins and their role as soluble electron carriers in bacterial photosynthesis: tale of a discovery

@article{Ciurli2004HighPI,
  title={High potential iron–sulfur proteins and their role as soluble electron carriers in bacterial photosynthesis: tale of a discovery},
  author={Stefano Ciurli and Francesco Musiani},
  journal={Photosynthesis Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={85},
  pages={115-131}
}
This review is an attempt to retrace the chronicle of the discovery of the role of high-potential iron–sulfur proteins (HiPIPs) as electron carriers in the photosynthetic chain of bacteria. Data and facts are presented through the magnifying lenses of the authors, using their best judgment to filter and elaborate on the many facets of the research carried out on this class of proteins over the years. The tale is divided into four main periods: the seeds, the blooming, the ripening, and the… 

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