High levels of environmental noise erode pair preferences in zebra finches: implications for noise pollution

@article{Swaddle2007HighLO,
  title={High levels of environmental noise erode pair preferences in zebra finches: implications for noise pollution},
  author={John P. Swaddle and Laura C. Page},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2007},
  volume={74},
  pages={363-368}
}

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