• Corpus ID: 10903733

High-intensity interval training and hypertension: maximizing the benefits of exercise?

@article{Ciolac2012HighintensityIT,
  title={High-intensity interval training and hypertension: maximizing the benefits of exercise?},
  author={Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac},
  journal={American journal of cardiovascular disease},
  year={2012},
  volume={2 2},
  pages={
          102-10
        }
}
  • E. Ciolac
  • Published 2012
  • Medicine, Biology
  • American journal of cardiovascular disease
Essential arterial hypertension is the most common risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Regular exercise is a well-established intervention for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Continuous moderate-intensity exercise training (CMT) that can be sustained for 30 min or more has been traditionally recommended for hypertension prevention and treatment. On the other hand, several studies have shown that high-intensity interval training (HIT), which consists of several… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

High-Intensity Interval Training Versus Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in the Prevention/Management of Cardiovascular Disease

Evaluated HIIT relative to MICT in the prevention and management of cardiovascular conditions, and any potential safety issues surrounding the suitability and/or tolerability of HIIT for patients with CVD are explored, and the potential optimal prescriptive variables ofHIIT for application in the clinical environment are explored.

Exercise and Hypertension.

  • Ş. Alpsoy
  • Medicine, Education
    Advances in experimental medicine and biology
  • 2020
Regular exercise should therefore be recommended for all individuals including normotensive, prehypertensives, and hypertensives.

High­intensity interval training vs. moderate­intensity continuous training in the prevention/management of cardiovascular disease

Evaluated HIIT relative to MICT in the prevention and management of cardiovascular conditions, and any potential safety issues surrounding the suitability and/or tolerability of HIIT for patients with cardiovascular disease are explored to explore the potential optimal prescriptive variables ofHIIT for application in the clinical environment.

The Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Hypertension: Current Consensus and Emerging Research

This chapter discusses new and emerging research on the effects of acute and chronic aerobic exercise on blood pressure that has the potential to alter the way in which aerobic exercise is prescribed to prevent, treat, and control hypertension in the future.

Exercise training improves ambulatory blood pressure but not arterial stiffness in heart transplant recipients.

Effects of Aerobic Exercise Versus High-Intensity Interval Training on V̇O2max and Blood Pressure

Today, more than 20% of the world's population suffers from hypertension, a major risk factor for heart disease. Therefore, lifestyle modifications such as dietary change, smoking cessation, and

Exercise intensity and hypertension: what’s new?

One bout of aerobic exercise and regular participation in aerobic exercise has been shown to result in a lowering of office and ambulatory blood pressure of hypertensive individuals, and faster, more intense forms of exercise can also bring about blood pressure reduction in the hypertensive population.

Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements

Highintensity interval training (HIT), which consist of several bouts of high-intensity exercise interspersed with intervals of rest or active recovery, may have superior effects for improving glycemic control and other health-related markers.

[Cardiovascular recovery during intermittent exercise in highly-adherent partic pants with hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus].

A HIIT program reduces the cardiovascular effort to a given work-load and improves cardiovascular recovery after exercise.

Acute Effects of Moderate Continuous Training on Stress Test-Related Pulse Pressure and Wave Reflection in Healthy Men

Investigation of the acute effects of moderate continuous training on established markers of arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk during standardized cold pressor stress testing found higher physical conditioning status was associated with more favorable effects on stress test-related arterial compliance.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 49 REFERENCES

Heart rate response to exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness of young women at high familial risk for hypertension: effects of interval vs continuous training

  • E. CiolacE. BocchiJ. GreveG. Guimãraes
  • Medicine
    European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology
  • 2011
Exercise intensity was an important factor in improving HR recovery and CRF of FH+women and may have important implications for designing exercise-training programmes for the prevention of an inherited hypertensive disorder.

Effects of high-intensity aerobic interval training vs. moderate exercise on hemodynamic, metabolic and neuro-humoral abnormalities of young normotensive women at high familial risk for hypertension

Exercise intensity was an important factor in improving cardiorespiratory fitness and reversing hemodynamic, metabolic and hormonal alterations involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

Aerobic Interval Training Versus Continuous Moderate Exercise as a Treatment for the Metabolic Syndrome: A Pilot Study

Exercise intensity was an important factor for improving aerobic capacity and reversing the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome.

Effects of continuous vs. interval exercise training on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in treated hypertension

Continuous and interval exercise training were beneficial for blood pressure control, but only interval training reduced arterial stiffness in treated hypertensive subjects.

High intensity aerobic interval exercise is superior to moderate intensity exercise for increasing aerobic capacity in patients with coronary artery disease

  • Ø. RognmoEva V HetlandJ. HelgerudJ. HoffS. Slørdahl
  • Medicine
    European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology
  • 2004
High intensity aerobic interval exercise is superior to moderate exercise for increasing VO2peak in stable CAD-patients, and may be useful in designing effective training programmes for improved health in the future.

Superior Cardiovascular Effect of Aerobic Interval Training Versus Moderate Continuous Training in Heart Failure Patients: A Randomized Study

Exercise intensity was an important factor for reversing LV remodeling and improving aerobic capacity, endothelial function, and quality of life in patients with postinfarction heart failure.

Effects of Endurance Training on Blood Pressure, Blood Pressure–Regulating Mechanisms, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors

A aerobic endurance training decreases blood pressure through a reduction of vascular resistance, in which the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system appear to be involved, and favorably affects concomitant cardiovascular risk factors.

Walking to Work and the Risk for Hypertension in Men: The Osaka Health Survey

This prospectively examined the relation of mild physical activity, especially walking to work, and leisure-time physical activity to the risk for hypertension during 6 to 16 years of observation in middle-aged working Japanese men.

The significance of hypertensive response to exercise as a predictor of hypertension and cardiovascular disease

It seems that subjects with ExBPR should be followed more closely and be instructed for lifestyle modifications which may delay the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases.